What do you need to get started with tapestry weaving?

What do you need to get started with tapestry weaving?

I get a lot of pretty great email, but this one really made me smile. 

" My 10-year-old grandson was given a loom for Christmas last year and there it stood on the piano as they couldn't fathom how a large ball of wool was supposed to go through narrow slots...."

It goes on from there. In this post I talk about what you need to get started with tapestry weaving. And it isn't much!

Four things a tapestry weaver needs to remember

Four things a tapestry weaver needs to remember

Every discipline has something that trips people up when they’re learning it. I've been teaching tapestry for a long time and over the years I've noticed that there are four consistent things that cause tapestry weavers the most trouble. These things are more common for new tapestry weavers, but all of us have moments from time to time when we just don't see why the weaving isn't working.

Here are the four things I see tripping people up the most:

  1. Wait for the popped-up warp

Why do you weave from the bottom to the top of a tapestry?

Why do you weave from the bottom to the top of a tapestry?

Tapestry weaving is in some sense, taking a journey up the warp. It is a process that starts at the bottom and moves upward.

Always.

(okay, almost always)

I know some of you that have watched videos, read books, and even taken courses by some of the weavers prevalent on Instagram may be confused by this. They do teach weaving in the middle of the warp and then filling in around it with a needle. I maintain that this is a poor way to construct a tapestry and I’ll go so far as to even call it wrong. (with apologies for my stubbornness)

Here are my reasons.

The screen girl

The screen girl

I spend a lot of time on my computer. My business is all about tapestry weaving, but much of the work is done online, primarily teaching. I think I was born to be a teacher. I remember as kids my sister and I had a double-sided A-frame chalkboard and we'd play school with our friends and sometimes, I'd play with my stuffed animals if the real kids were tired of being "taught."

. . . .

The problem with spending so much time interacting with people online online is that it sets up an expectation for myself that is unrealistic. I have created a screen persona that doesn't always mesh with who the flesh-and-blood Rebecca is. In an online business, you have to use images, video, and text to sell yourself and so you strive to present a picture of who you are that isn't completely accurate. Of course I don't admit the things I really screwed up most of the time. I hope, as we all do, that people won't notice I made a mistake and they'll remember all the good work I did.